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Department of Physics and Astronomy: Guide to the Undergraduate Program Curriculum

Last updated: July 13, 2009

The curriculum requirements of the University are very complex. Due to the nature of a university which balances general liberal arts education with specialized education in the majors across all fields, a wide variety of liberal arts courses, courses in the respective majors, and general elective courses are offered, and among the liberal arts courses and the major courses, there are required courses that you compulsory as well as elective courses that you may choose according to your aptitude and needs. Enrolled students choose the courses that they wish to take within the scope of the regulations imposed by their major field of study and register their application for those courses. There are also requirements that students must fulfill for graduation, to which you must pay particular attention because these regulations and requirements are often subject to change.
You may find the relevant information on the homepage of Seoul National University, the homepage of the College of Natural Sciences , the homepage of the Faculty of Liberal Education and the portal site of Seoul National University, etc., but the best method is to confer with your advisory professor or the administrative office of the Physics and Astronomy Department (Physics Major) in order to confirm ahead of time your course completion status or the regulations that apply to you before you make your course registration application.
Here we will present the curriculum requirements that have been revised on December 1, 2008 and that takes effect beginning in the academic year 2010 (with the exception of the Basic Physics Mathematics requirement, which will take effect beginning in the second semester of 2009), applying mostly to undergraduate students in the Physics and Astronomy Department who matriculate in 2010. The purpose is to aid your understanding of important requirements for graduation and to remind you of the cautions involved when applying for course registration. Students who have matriculated before the year 2009 should refer to the prior version of the curriculum guidelines.
 
1. 1st Year Curriculum


New students matriculating in 2010 must complete the following courses in accordance with the ¡°Liberal Arts coursework credit distribution chart.¡± Among these, in order to register for the "College English 1, 2" or "Advanced English" courses within the ¡°Foundations of Academics¡± field, you must have pre-acquired a TEPS or TOEFL score higher than a certain standard, and in order to register for "Advanced Mathematics and Exercises 1¡± or " Calculus & Exercises 1," you must have received a passing grade in the ¡°Achievement Assessment Test in Mathematics¡± that is conducted in February immediately prior to your matriculation. Also in the field of Physics, you are required to demonstrate your eligibility to register for "Advanced Physics 1" by taking the Achievement Assessment Test prior to matriculation.
 
¢Á Regulations regarding the registration for ¡°College English 1, 2¡± or "Advanced English" courses

  1) Newly matriculating students must register for the respective courses in accordance with their score results on the special TEPS test that is conducted before the beginning of the first semester (which is conducted for students accepted to the university through rolling or regular admissions) or on a regular TEPS test that was taken within 2 years prior to the (expected) date of matriculation or on a regular TEPS test taken individually after the above mentioned special test, or in accordance with their score results on a TOEFL test taken individually within the two years prior to the (expected) date of matriculation.

2) Registration eligibility for each course

¤· Registration for Advanced English (Required, Only those eligible may register)
    - TEPS score of 801 or higher, or TOEFL score of 597 (CBT 247, iBT 99) or higher
    - Students are exempt from the ¡°College English¡± course completion requirement
¤· Registration for Advanced English after the completion of ¡°College English 2¡± (Required, Only those eligible may register)
    - TEPS score of 701 - 800, or TOEFL score of 560-596 (CBT 220 246, iBT 85 98)
¤· Registration for ¡°¡°College English 2¡± or Advanced English after the completion of ¡°College English 1¡± (Required, Only those eligible may register)
    - TEPS score of 551 - 700, or TOEFL score of TOEFL 523-559 (CBT 193 219, iBT 70 84)
    - Or students who have acquired credits in Basic English
¤· Registration for Basic English
    - TEPS score of 550 or lower, or TOEFL score of TOEFL 522 (CBT 192, iBT 69) or lower, or students without TEPS or TOEFL scores
    - After completing Basic English, students must also complete ¡°College English 1¡± and ¡°College English 2¡± (or ¡°Advanced English¡±)

Caution: these regulations have changed several times in the past and therefore the requirements applied to students of each matriculating year differ.
Cautions related to the registration for ¡°College English 1, 2¡± or "Advanced English" courses and the registration eligibility requirements for students of each matriculating year should be confirmed by referring to the Liberal Arts courses curriculum requirement regulations (English) provided by the Faculty of Liberal Education. (http://liberaledu.snu.ac.kr/korean/pages/information/provision_eng.php)

¢Á Achievement Assessment Test in Mathematics

  Newly matriculating students in the Physics and Astronomy department are all required to take the Achievement Assessment Test in Mathematics which is conducted in February immediately before the beginning of the first semester, and students who score highly on this test become qualified to register for the "Advanced Mathematics and Exercises 1¡± course in lieu of the "Mathematics and Exercises 1" course. However, we recommend that students take the "Calculus & Exercises 1" course which will provided an more detailed education in the mathematics that forms the foundation for studies in physics and astronomy.
Details regarding the Achievement Assessment Test in Mathematics and sample questions may be found in the following separate website:
(http://www.math.snu.ac.kr/taoffice/calculus/basic/notice_basic.html)

¢Á Achievement Assessment Test in Physics

  Newly matriculating students in the Physics and Astronomy department have the option to take the Achievement Assessment Test in Physics test that is conducted in February immediately before the beginning of the first semester. Students who have been confirmed and selected through this test as being qualified above a certain standard become eligible to register for " Advanced Physics 1" in lieu of the ¡°Physics 1¡± course.

" Advanced Physics 1" is a course designed with additional coursework along with a requirement to undertake a student project, and the course grade is assessed based on absolute ratings, without the limitations on grade ranking distributions that are applied to courses that are evaluated based upon relative ratings. The completion of the " Advanced Physics 1" course shall be recorded in your English transcript as "Honor Physics 1" and will be referenced in document-based evaluations for graduate school admissions as well as in recommendations for graduate study abroad, and hence this coursework will be differentiate students from those who complete other Physics courses.

In the second semester as well, students who have taken and received high grades in the "Advanced Physics 1" course and students who have taken and received high grades in the " Physics 1" are given the opportunity to take a separate Achievement Assessment Test in Physics, and those selected based upon high scores in this test will become eligible to register for the " Advanced Physics 2" course.


¢Á Liberal Arts coursework credit distribution chart for Academic Year 2010
CategoryFirst yearSecond yearThird yearTotalNotes
12Total12°è12Total
Foundations of Academics14
(15)
13
(14)
27
(29)
2 2   29
(31)
*[1-1] College Korean (3), Mathematics and Exercises 1 or Advanced Mathematics and Exercises 1(3) (or Calculus & Exercises 1 (4)
*[1-2] Mathematics and Exercises 2(3) or Advanced Mathematics and Exercises 2(3) (orCalculus&Exercises2(4))
*[1st year 1¡¤2] Selective required courses (16) Students must complete 12 credits or more from among the following and must simultaneously complete the respective experiment course: Statistics (3), Physics 1¡¤2 (orAdvancedPhysics1¡¤2)(6), Physics (3), Chemistry 1¡¤2 (orAdvancedChemistry1¡¤2)(6), Chemistry (3), Biology 1¡¤2(6), Biology (3), Earth Environmental Science (3), Astronomy (3), Atmospheric Science (3), Earth System Science (3), Oceanography (3) (Note,however,thattheStatistics(3)courseisrequiredforthoseinthe S Mathematical Science and Statistics department groups)
*[1-2] [2-1] Two or four credits must be completed from among the ¡°College English 1, 2¡± or "Advanced English" courses in accordance with the student¡¯s TEPS test scores
Core liberal artsLiterature   33633612*Must completed 12 credits in 3 or more areas (However, in the Nature and Technology and the Life and Environment areas, only credits from the ¡°Science in History¡± (027.008)(3)' course shall be acknowledged)
History and philosophy
Society and ideology
Understanding nature
Elective 336       6 
Total for the Liberal Arts credits17
(18)
16
(17)
33
(35)
53833647
(49)
 
* Students who register for Statistics (3), Physics ¡¤2(6) (orAdvanced Physics 1¡¤2)(6), Chemistry 1¡¤2(6) (orAdvancedChemistry1¡¤2)(6), Biology 1¡¤2(6), Physics (6), Chemistry (3), Biology (3), Earth Environmental Science (3), Astronomy (3), Atmospheric Science (3), Earth System Science (3), Oceanography (3) are required in the same semester to simultaneously register for the respective experiment course, which should be one the following: Statistics Experiments (1), Physics Experiments 1¡¤2(2), Chemistry Experiments 1¡¤2(2), Biology Experiments 1¡¤2(2) Physics Experiments (1), Chemistry Experiments (1), Biology Experiments (1), Earth Environmental Science Experiments (1), Astronomy Experiments (1), Atmospheric Science Experiments (1), Earth System Science Experiments (1), Oceanography Experiments (1)

* Students who have been selected as a Most Outstanding Student in accordance with the prescribed procedures of the Basic Science Curriculum Administration Assessment Committee may be exempt from a minimum of 6 credits to a maximum of 14 credits of required coursework in the Foundations of Academics area (mathematics, basic science). In cases where a student is thus exempt from certain courses, the student is regarded as having completed the said course but the credits are not added toward the number of completed credits. Note, however, that if the number of exempt credits is 11 or more, the student must still fulfill the requirement regarding the minimum number of liberal arts coursework credits (36 credits).
 
¢Á Basic Science Course among the Liberal Arts Foundation of Academics(010area)

010.101Calculus 13-2-2
010.102Calculus 23-2-2
010.103 Honor Calculus and Practice 1 3-2-2
010.104Honor Calculus and Practice 2 3-2-2
010.112 Physics 1 3-3-0
010.113 Physics 2 3-3-0
010.114 Physics for Life Science 1 3-3-0
010.115 Physics for Life Science 2 3-3-0
010.116 Physics 3-3-0
010.117 Chemistry 1 3-3-0
010.118 Chemistry 2 3-3-0
010.119 Chemistry 3-3-0
010.122 Biology 1 3-3-0
010.123Biology 23-3-0
010.125Biology3-3-0
010.134Earth and Environmental Sciences3-3-0
010.135Astronomy3-3-0
010.136Atmospheric Science3-3-0
010.137Earth System Science3-3-0
010.138Oceanography3-3-0
010.139Statistics3-3-0
010.146Differential and Integral Calculus 14-3-2
010.147Differential and Integral Calculus 24-3-2
010.148Honor Physics 1 3-3-0
010.149Honor Physics 2 3-3-0
010.150Honor Chemistry 13-3-0
010.151Honor Chemistry 23-3-0
010.312Physics Lab 11-0-2
010.313Physics Lab 21-0-2
010.317Chemistry Lab 11-0-2
010.318Chemistry Lab 21-0-2
010.322Biology Lab 11-0-2
010.323Biology Lab 21-0-2
010.316Physics Lab1-0-2
010.319Chemistry Lab1-0-2
010.325Biology Lab1-0-2
010.334Earth and Environmental Sciences Lab1-0-2
010.335 Astronomy Lab 1-0-2
010.336 Atmospheric Science Lab 1-0-2
010.337Earth System Science Lab 1-0-2
010.338Oceanography Lab 1-0-2
010.339Statistics Lab 1-0-2
    Note of explanation: Whatdoes¡°3-2-2¡± mean?

  The reference to 3-2-2 (or 3-3-0, 1-0-2) that is indicated at the end of the name of the course means the following. The first ¡°3¡± refers to the number of credits given, the ¡°2¡± in the center refers to the number of lecture hours per week, and the last ¡°2¡± means the number of experiment (or workshop) hours per week. Therefore, the indicator ¡°3-3¡± means that the course confers 3 credits with only 3 hours of lectures per week, while ¡°1-0-2¡± would mean that the course confers 1 credit without any lectures, and only requires 2 hours of experiments per week. Lectures that teach 1 hour per week are given 1 credit, while for experiments (or workshops), 2 hours per week is given 1 credit.

 
¢Á Core liberal arts (023-026 area) courses
023. Literature and the arts
023.001 Life and Literture in Korea 3-3-0
023.002Contemporary Korean Literature and Thoughts3-3-0
023.003Art and Civilization of Western World3-3-0
023.004Art and Civilization in Asia3-3-0
023.005Literature and Mass Culture 3-3-0
023.006ARussian Life and Culture 3-3-0
023.007Literature and Society 3-3-0
023.008An Introduction to Western Drama and Theater 3-3-0
023.009Imagination and Culture3-3-0
023.010Literature & Society of Latin America 3-3-0
023.011BWorld of Languages 3-3-0
023.012Modern Society and Global Language 3-3-0
023.013Understanding Western Literature, 1500-1900 3-3-0
023.014Introduction to Oriental Classics3-3-0
023.015Introduction to Modern Music 3-3-0
023.016Language and Culture of the Koreans3-3-0
023.107Reading of East Asian Classics3-3-0
023.018Chinese Character and Oriental Culture3-3-0
023.019Literature and Psychoanalysis3-3-0
023.020Epic Tradition in the West3-3-0
023.021Language in the Mind3-3-0
023.022Women and Literature3-3-0
023.023Music in Western Civilization 3-3-0

024. History and philosophy
024.001Reviews of Korean History3-3-0
024.002ATraditional Culture of Korea and the Kyujanggak Archive3-3-0
024.003A New Perspective on Korean cultural history3-3-0
024.004Tradition and Modernity in East Asia3-3-0
024.005 The Confluence of the Eastern and the Western Civilizations 3-3-0
024.006Cultural Traditions of the West 3-3-0
024.007Modern Civilization of the West3-3-0
024.008The Origin of Civilization 3-3-0
024.009AHistory and Perspective of Aesthetics3-3-0
024.010Aesthetics and Art Theory 3-3-0
024.011Religious Wisdom in East and West 3-3-0
024.012Contemporary Religion and Culture3-3-0
024.013 Understanding Western Philosophy3-3-0
024.014 Understanding Asian Philosophy3-3-0
024.015 Modern Society and Ethics3-3-0
024.016 Nationlism in Modern & Contemporary Korea3-3-0
024.017 Imperial Power and the State in Traditionna East Asia3-3-0
024.018 Understanding Korean Philosophy3-3-0
024.019 Trends in Contemporary Philosophy3-3-0
024.020 Phiosophy in Historical Context3-3-0
024.023 Islamic Civilization in World History3-3-0
024.024 Understanding Bible and Christian Thought 3-3-0

025. Society and ideology
025.001Business of Society3-3-0
025.002 Mankind and Food3-3-0
025.003Society and Law)3-3-0
025.004Human Life and Social Welfare3-3-0
025.005The State and Education3-3-0
025.006Human Life and Economy3-3-0
025.007Human Rights, NGOm and International community3-3-0
025.008Human Life and Social Welfare3-3-0
025.009Inquiry on Human Mind 3-3-0
025.010Knowledge based Society and Communication3-3-0
025.011Historical Understanding of International Relations3-3-0
025.012Man and Culture 3-3-0
025.013Introduction to Contemporary Political Wolrd3-3-0
025.014AGlobal and Regional Environmental issue 3-3-0
025.015The Modern State and Public Administration3-3-0
025.016Ideological Foudation of Politics3-3-0
025.017Intorduction to Modern Economy3-3-0
025.018Idelogies in Korea and World Nations3-3-0
025.019Psychology and Society3-3-0
025.020Understanding Welfare saates3-3-0
025.021Women & Law3-3-0
025.022Market Economy and Low3-3-0
025.023Woman and Leadership3-3-0
025.024Mapping your life across time3-3-0
025.025The Politics of Law3-3-0
025.026Understanding Korea Politics3-3-0
025.032Innovation and Regional Changes in the World 3-3-0
026.012Understanding Science in the Historical Setting3-3-0

026. Understanding nature
027.008Understanding Science in the Historical Setting3-3-0

(Cautionary note: because the list offered courses are subject to frequent changes, refer to the Course Listings Handbook or the Faculty of Liberal Education information data when registering for your classes¡³

 
¢Á Basic Science course completion structure for 1st Year students

year/semesterI II
I010.101* Mathematics and Exercises 1
(or 010.146 Calculus & Exercises 1)

010.112   Physics 1
(or 010.148 Advanced Physics 1)
010.312   Physics Experiments 1

010.116   Physics
010.316   Physics Experiments

010.117   Chemistry 1
(or 010.150 Advanced Chemistry 1)
010.317   Chemistry Experiments 1

010.119   Chemistry
010.319   hemistry Experiments

010.122   Biology 1
010.322   Biology Experiments 1

010.125   Biology
010.325   Biology Experiments

010.134   Earth Environmental Science
010.334   Earth Environmental Science Experiments

010.135   Astronomy
010.335   Astronomy Experiments

010.136   Atmospheric Science
010.336   Atmospheric Science Experiments

010.137   Earth System Science
010.337   Earth System Science Experiments

010.138   Oceanography
010.338   Oceanography Experiments

010.139   Statistics
010.339   Statistics Experiments

010.102* Mathematics and Exercises 2
(or 010.147 Calculus & Exercises 2)


010.113   Physics 2
(or 010.149 Advanced Physics 2)
010.313   Physics Experiments 2


010.116   Physics
010.316   Physics Experiments

010.118   Chemistry 2
(or 010.151 Advanced Chemistry 2)
010.318   Chemistry Experiments 2


010.119   Chemistry
010.319   Chemistry Experiments

010.123   Biology 2
010.323   Biology Experiments 2


010.125   Biology
010.325   Biology Experiments

010.134   Earth Environmental Science
010.334   Earth Environmental Science Experiments

010.135   Astronomy
010.335   Astronomy Experiments

010.136   Oceanography
010.336   Oceanography Experiments

010.137   Earth System Science
010.337   Atmospheric Science Experiments

010.138   Oceanography
010.338   Oceanography Experiments

010.139   Statistics
010.339   Statistics Experiments

           The asterisk (*) to the right of the course number indicates that the course is required.

 
¢Á Overview of the 1st Year Basic Science Coursework

010.101Calculus 13-2-2
  As a basic mathematics course for students in science and engineering, it discusses the properties of real numbers, series, Taylor expansions, vectors, matrices and determinants, curves, and their applications. (the course is required)
010.102Calculus 23-2-2
  As a sequel to "Calculus 1", derivatives and integrals of several variable functions, vector fields, Green theorem and Stokes theorem and their applications are discussed in this course.(the course is required)
010.146Differential and Integral Calculus 14-3-2
  As a basic mathematics course for students in science and engineering, properties of real numbers, series, Taylor expansions, vectors, matrices and determinants, curves, and their applications are discussed in depth.
010.147Differential and Integral Calculus 24-3-2
  As a sequel to of "Differential and Integral Calculus 1", derivatives and integrals of several variable functions, vector fields, Green theorem and Stokes theorem and their applications are discussed in depth.
010.112Physics 13-3-0
   This is an introductory physics course for students majoring in natural science or engineering. Topics discussed include gravitation, fundamentals on the motion of particles, energy, wave motion, and thermal physics.
010.113Physics 2 (Physics 2)3-3-0
  This is an introductory physics course for students majoring in natural science or engineering. Topics discussed include electricity and magnetism, light, special relativity, basic quantum physics, and atomic and particle physics. (Students must be also complete "Physics Experiments 2".)
010.148Honor Physics 1 3-3-0
  In this course, the same contents as in Physics 1 are taught at a more, conceptually and mathematically, advanced level. Topics to be dealt with include Newton's law, force and motion, conservation of momentum, work, potential energy and conservation of energy, torque and angular momentum, rigid bodies and rotational motion, gravitation, fluids, vibrational motion, waves, entropy and the laws of thermodynamics. This course is intended for more advanced students with some degree of familiarity with the materials in Physics 1 already. (Students are required eligibility to register by taking the Achievement Assessment Test)
010.149Honor Physics 23-3-0
  In this course, the same contents as in Physics 2 are taught at a more advanced level. Topics to be dealt with include Coulomb's law, Gauss' law, electrostatic field and potential, electrostatic energy, capacitance, electric currents, magnetic fields, Ampere's law, time-varying fields and Faraday's law of induction, Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves, optics, relativity, and introduction to modern physics. This course is intended for more advanced students with some degree of familiarity with the materials in Physics 2 already. (students who have taken and received high grades in the "Advanced Physics 1" course and students who have taken and received high grades in the " Physics 1" are given the opportunity to take a separate Achievement Assessment Test in Physics, and those selected based upon high scores in this test will become eligible to register.)
010.312Physics Lab. 11-0-2
  This course provides students with opportunities to explore various phenomena in nature and to understand the basic physical principles hidden in everyday life by actively participating in a series of experiments. This course provides integrated laboratory experiences to students who want to major in physics, natural science, engineering, and other related fields. Experiments are chosen from topics like forces and motion, energy, waves, and thermodynamics.(Students must be also complete "Physics 1".)
010.313Physics Lab. 21-0-2
  As a sequel to 010.312 Physics Lab 1, this course provides students with opportunities to explore various phenomena in nature and to understand the basic physical principles hidden in everyday life by actively participating in a series of experiments. Experiments are chosen from topics like electrical phenomena in matter, magnetic phenomena, light, special relativity, and quantum phenomena in the atomic world. (Students must be also complete "Physics 2".)
010.116Physics3-3-0
   This is an introductory physics course for students majoring in natural science or engineering. Topics discussed include gravitation, fundamentals on the motion of particles, energy, wave motion, and thermal physics. (Students must be also complete "Physics Experimtne")
010.316Physics Lab.1-0-2
  This one-semester course provides students in science (or in liberal arts, or social sciences) with laboratory experiences as needed to appreciate how physics works. Students are given opportunities to actively participate in a series of experiments, through which they learn the physical principles hidden in nature and everyday life. Experiments are chosen form topics like force and motion, waves, electricity and magnetism, and some quantum phenomena. (Students must be also complete "Physics")
 
2. Selecting your major: Physics or Astronomy
 
Students who matriculate in the department of Physics and Astronomy must declare their major as either Physics or Astronomy near the end of the 1styear. In order to aid your selection, the department of Physics and Astronomy offers an orientation 1 month prior to your major declaration to introduce the majors within the department.
Students must participate in this orientation and listen to the explanations regarding the major fields of study and then decide between Physics or Astronomy as their original major, complete the major selection application document, and submit the application to the administrative office of the department of Physics and Astronomy (Physics majors). Depending on the major that you have selected, the courses required in the 2nd year may differ. You have one opportunity at the end of the 2nd year to change the major that you have originally selected.

Hereafter we will refer to the cautionary notes on course registration that apply only to students who major in Physics. Students majoring in Astronomy should follow separate guidelines offered elsewhere.

 
3. Course registration for the major curriculum
 
Beginning in the second year, students register for 17 credits or less of courses in their major and core liberal arts courses as well as elective courses that meet their tastes and needs each semester, in accordance with the standard course completion structure for the major field selected for their undergraduate program. If the student¡¯s grade point average for the immediately preceding two semesters is 3.3 or higher, the student may acquire prior approval from the advisory professor and the head of the department to take up to 21 credits in the following semester.
 
¢Á Course for Physics Majors
3342.201A Foundations of Modern Physics 3-3-0
300.211* Mechanics 1 3-3-0
300.212 Mechanics 2 3-3-0
300.214* Electricity and Magnetism 3-3-0
3348.215* Exercises in Mechanics 1 1-0-2
3348.216 Exercises in Mechanics 2 1-0-2
3348.217* Exercises in Electricity and Magnetism 1-0-2
3342.202* Electronics and Measurement Techniques for Science and Engineering Students 3-1-4
3348.203 Rudimentary Mathematical Methods of Physics 3-3-0
884.301 Electromagnetic Waves and Optics 3-3-0
3348.309 Exercises in Electromagnetic Waves and Optics 1-0-2
884.302* Thermal and Statistical Physics 3-3-0
884.303* Quantum Physics 1 3-3-0
3348.310* Exercises in Quantum Physics 1 1-0-2
884.304* Quantum Physics 2 3-3-0
3348.311* Exercises in Quantum Physics 2 1-0-2
884.306 Mathematical Methods of Physics 3-3-0
884.307A* Intermediate Physics Laboratory 1 3-0-6
884.308A Intermediate Physics Laboratory 2 3-0-6
884.310 Computational Physics 3-3-0
884.401A Relativity and Spacetime 3-3-0
884.402 Nuclei and Particles 3-3-0
884.403 Properties of Solids 3-3-0
884.404 Fluid Mechanics 3-3-0
884.405A Advanced Optics 3-3-0
884.406A Physics and New Technology 3-3-0
884.409 Senior Physics Laboratory 3-0-6
3348.401 Introductory Biological Physics 3-3-0
3348.402 Collective Phenomena in Condensed Matter Physics 3-3-0
884.407A Studies on Historic Papers in Physics 3-3-0
3348.408 Independent Study 1 3-3-0
3348.410 Independent Study 2 3-3-0
(The asterisk (*) indicates that the course is required)
 
Courses for Non-major Students


300.209C Mechanics: Short Course 3-3-0
3342.002A Electromagnetism: Short Course 3-3-0
3348.305A Quantum Physics: Short Course 3-3-0
 
Tracks for Undergraduate Majors
year¡¬semesterIII

2

300.211* Mechanics 1#
3348.215* Exercises in Mechanics
3342.201A Foundation of Modern Physics
881.007 Introduction to Linear Algebra

300.212 Mechanics 2#
3348.216 Exercises in Mechanics 2
300.214* Electricity and Magnetism#
3348.217* Exercises in Electricity and Magnetism
3342.202* Electronics and Measurement Techni
3348.203 Rudimentary Mathematical Methods of Physics

3
884.301 Electromagnetic Waves and Optics#
3348.309 Exercises in Electromagnetic Waves and Optics
884.303* Quantum Physics 1#
3348.310* Exercises in Quantum Physics
884.306 Mathematical Methods of Physics
884.307A* Intermediate Physics Laboratory 1 1
881.004 Complex Variables

884.302* Thermal and Statistical Physics
884.304* Quantum Physics 2#
3348.311* Exercises in Quantum Physics 2
884.308A Intermediate Physics Laboratory 2
884.310 Computational Physics

4
884.401A Relativity and Spacetime
884.403 Properties of Solids
884.404 Fluid Mechanics
884.405A Advanced Optics
884.409 Senior Physics Laboratory
3348.401 Introductory Biological Physics
3348.408 Independent Study in Theoretical Physics 1

884.402 Nuclei and Particles
884.404 Fluid Mechanics
884.406A Physics and New Technology
3348.403 Collective Phenomena in Condensed Matter Physics
884.407A Studies on Historic Articles of Physics
3348.410 Independent Study in Experimental Physics 2
- The asterisk (*)to the right of the course number indicates that the course is required.
- The ¡°#¡± to the right of the course title indicates that students are required to simultaneously registered for the relevant practice course. (However, in special cases where there is a valid reason why a student cannot take the practice course, such as in cases where the student has exceeded the maximum number of credits that can be registered for the semester or is retaking the course, the student must acquire the pezzrmission to not take the practice course from the professor in charge of the course)
 
¢ÁCredited as Major Elective for Physics Major in Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
1) All course in the Physics major are acknowledged as major electives, but ¡°Single semester Mechanics¡±, ¡°Single semester Electromagnetics¡± and ¡°Single semester Quantum Physics¡± cannotbetakenforrespectiveseparatecreditrecognitioninadditiontocoursecreditsin¡°Mechanics1¡±,' Electricity and Magnetism ' and ' Quantum Physics 1.'
2) Recognition shall be given for up to 15 credits for courses offered by other majors (departments) in the College of Natural Sciences and the College of Engineering.(Examples: Introductory Astrophysics 1¡¤2, Linear Algebra, Complex Variables, Differential equations, Analytical Chemistry Lab, Cell Biology, Circuit Theory 1¡¤2 etc.)
3) Coursework offered by the masters or masters and doctoral program in the Physics major (graduate school)
4) Other courses acknowledged by the head of the department
 
¢ÁDepartmental Course Requirements
  In the case of student majoring in one field of study, the student must complete 60 or more credits among courses recognized as major electives, but the following courses are required.
1) 300.211 (Mechanics 1), 300.215 (Mechanics 1 Practice), 300.214 (Electricity and Magnetism), 300.217 (Electricity and Magnetism Practice), 884.303 (Quantum Physics 1), 884.312 (Quantum Physics 1 Practice), 884.304 (Quantum Physics 2), 884.313 (Quantum Physics 2 Practice), 884.302 (Heat and Statistical Physics): 9 courses for 19 credits
2) 3342.202 (Electronics and Measurement Techniques) and 884.307 (Intermediate Physics Experiments 1): 2 courses for 6 credits
3)36 credits or more from liberal arts courses, 39 credits or more from major courses and a total of 130 credits or more must be completed to be eligible for graduation from the undergraduate program.
 
¢ÁOverview of the Physics major Coursework
3342.201AFoundation of Modern Physics 3-3-0
      Understanding Nature from a microscopic picture, which constitutes the main theme of modern physics, is an enterprise that began only after the development of relativity and quantum concepts in the early 20th century. This course takes an approach to modern physics in a somewhat qualitative manner, as a preliminary course prior to more systematic studies at later stages. Based on simple thermodynamics and a little bit of statistical mechanics, order-of-magnitude analysis, elementary quantum notions, special relativity, and basic conservation laws, we will seek an explanation on the possible states of matter, their microscopic constituents, and related conspicuous physical phenomena. This course is expected to help students know about major concerns and future directions of modern physics. Prior knowledge of physics on the level of Physics 1, 2 is required.
300.211*Mechanics 1 3-3-0
      This is the standard course on undergraduate classical mechanics for students who have taken Physics1, 2 and Physics Lab 1,2. Major topics to be discussed are : Vectors, Newton's laws of motion, conservative force and potential energy, simple harmonic motion, nonlinear oscillations, central force motion (including the Kepler problem and Rutherford scattering), and dynamics of many particle systems.
3348.215*Exercises in Mechanics 1 1-0-2
      For the purpose of boosting the understanding of materials taught in 'Mechanics 1 and also the student's ability to apply involved concepts, training instructions are given toward finding solutions to some explicit problems pertaining to Mechanics 1.
300.212Mechanics 23-3-0
   This course is a sequal to Mechanics 1. Major topics to be discussed are : gravitational field, continuum mechanics, motion in non-inertial reference frames, calculus of variations, generalized coordinates and Lagrange's equations, general theory of small oscillations, rigid body dynamics, and basic Hamiltonian mechanics.
3348.216Exercises in Mechanics 2 1-0-2
   For the purpose of boosting the understanding of materials taught in Mechanics 2 and also the student's ability to apply involved concepts, training instructions are given toward finding solutions to some explicit problems pertaining to Mechanics 2.
300.214*Electricity and Magnetism 3-3-0
   This course provides students with basic knowledge on the physical theory that can be used to describe all kinds of macroscopic electric and magnetic phenomena. It is assumed that students in this course have taken Physics 1, 2 and Physics Lab 1, 2 already. Topics to be discussed include vector calculus, electrostatics, Poisson's equation, solutions of Laplace's equations and electrostatic boundary value problems, electric fields in dielectric materials and polarization, magnetic field by a steady current distribution, electric and magnetic energies, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, Maxwell equations, and Poynting's vector.
3348.217*Exercises in Electricity and Magnetism 1-0-2
   For the purpose of boosting the understanding of materials taught in Electricity and Magnetism and also the student's ability to apply involved concepts, training instructions are given toward finding solutions to some explicit problems pertaining to Electricity and Magnetism.
3342.202*Electronics and Measurement Techniques for Science and Engineering Students 3-1-4
   This course is to introduce the electronics and measurement techniques widely used in experiments to science and engineering students. The operation principles and the characteristics of diode, transistor and op amp together with their applications are covered. Furthermore, digital devices, interfacing card, control of Light Emitting Diode(LED), PROM/FPGA, etc. will also be studied. This course consists of one hour class lecture and 4 hour experiment in the lab per week and can be useful to both undergraduate and graduate students.
3348.203Rudimentary Mathematical Methods of Physics 3-3-0
   In this course, students will study mathematical tools necessary for the description of physical phenomena and be trained to learn their application to physics. Topics include curvilinear coordinate systems, vector calculus, and basic theory of ordinary differential equations and linear algebra. Prior knowledge of mathematics on the level of Calculus 1, 2 is required.)
884.301Electromagnetic Waves and Optics 3-3-0
   This course will cover topics ranging from Maxwell equations to generation propagation of electromagnetic waves, including aspects of wave optics, for students who have taken Electricity and Magnetism. Among the topics to be discussed are : Maxwell equations and the boundary conditions, electric circuits, electromagnetic waves in conductors and dielectrics, reflection and refraction at the interface of two dielectrics, interference and diffraction of light, radiation by oscillating dipoles, Lienard-Wiechert potential, and special relativity of electromagnetic fields.
3348.309Exercises in Electromagnetic Waves and Optics 1-0-2
   For the purpose of boosting the understanding of materials taught in Electromagnetic Waves and Optics and also the student's ability to apply involved concepts, training instructions are given toward finding solutions to some explicit problems pertaining to Electromagnetic Waves and Optics.
884.302*Thermal and Statistical Physics 3-3-0
   This course, intended for students who have taken Mechanics 1, 2 and Quantum Physics 1, discusses basic concepts and some simple applications of thermal and statistical physics. Among the topics discussed are : thermodynamic laws and their applications, the number of states and entropy, basic principles of statistical mechanics, ideal Bose gas, ideal Fermi gas, phase transition, the kinetic theory of gases, and Brownian motion.
884.303*Quantum Physics 13-3-0
   This course will cover the basic principles and theoretical structures of quantum mechanics, which are requisite for understanding modern physics. Topics will include classical mechanics and its limitation, the birth of wave mechanics and the uncertainty principle, the basic assumptions of quantum mechanics, Schrodinger equation, one-dimensional problem, and mathematical methods (operator and matrix representation). The courses Mechanics 1(or Mechanics : Short Course) and Electricity and Magnetism (or Electromagnetism : Short Course) are requisite.
3348.310* Exercises in Quantum Physics 11-0-2
   For the purpose of boosting the understanding of materials taught in Quantum Physics 1 and also the student's ability to apply involved concepts, training instructions are given toward finding solutions to some explicit problems pertaining to Quantum Physics 1.
884.304*Quantum Physics 23-3-0
   This continuation of the course Quantum Physics 1 will cover applications of quantum mechanics and approximation methods. Topics will include rotational symmetry, angular momentum, 3-dimensional problem, hydrogen atom, spin and Pauli's principle, perturbation theory, approximation method, and scattering theory.
3348.311* Exercises in Quantum Physics 21-0-2
   For the purpose of boosting the understanding of materials taught in Quantum Physics 2 and also the student's ability to apply involved concepts, training instructions are given toward finding solutions to some explicit problems pertaining to Quantum Physics 2.
884.306Mathematical Methods of Physics 3-3-0
   In this course, students will study some useful mathematical tools in analyzing physical problems at the intermediate-to-advanced level and learn the methodology accompanied with training. Topics include Sturm-Liouville theory, special functions, function space, linear operators, integral transforms, basic group theory, theory of analytic functions, and partial differential equations related to physical problems. Prior knowledge of mathematics on the level of Calculus 1, 2 and Rudimentary Mathematical Methods of Physics is required.
884.307A*Intermediate Physics Laboratory 1 3-0-6
   The course will introduce various intermediate topics in modern experimental physics (including optics, thermal physics, electromagnetism, and quantum physics) with an emphasis on a hands-on experience. The course will introduce concepts in experimental design as well as instrumentation in physics. The emphasis will be on developing students' ability to test and demonstrate various concepts in physics. Also important in this course is to learn how to analyze the experimental results and to communicate such results to their peers. Prerequisite : Eletronics and Measurement Techniques for Science and Engineering Students or a permission from the instructor.
884.308AIntermediate Physics Laboratory 2 3-0-6
   The course is a sequel to Intermediate Physics Laboratory 1. In this course a more independent approach by the students, in their completion of experimental topics and individual project (related to electromagnetism, quantum physics, and condensed matter physics), is expected. Each topic/project requires students to understand the underlying physics of the experiment and to optimize the instrumentation. Also emphasized is the ability to analyze and communicate the experimental results and to prepare a report. Prerequisite : Intermediate Physics Laboratory 1 or permission from the instructor.
884.310 Computational Physics3-2-2
   Through this course, students will improve their ability to use the computer for physics research. Topics will include basic numerical analysis, Monte-Carlo method, elementary methods of data analysis, parallel processing, neural network method, and basic concepts of computer devices.
884.401ARelativity and Spacetime 3-3-0
   This course will cover the basics of Special Relativity and its applications, gravitation and space-time geometry as understood by General Relativity, and related physical consequences. Topics include space-time in Special Relativity (Lorentz transformations, Minkowski space, etc.), relativistic mechanics and covariant electrodynamics, historical backgrounds of General Relativity, curved space-time, geodesic equations and Einstein's gravitational field equations, and some major consequences of General Relativity.
884.402Nuclei and Particles 3-3-0
   This course will cover the composition of atomic nuclei, main properties of nuclear force, kinds of elementary particles, and their interaction, symmetry, and symmetry breaking. Topics will include the basic language of nuclear and particle physics, experimental apparatus, nuclear models and nuclear interactions, interactions of leptons and hadrons, and recent issues in unification theories.
884.403Properties of Solids 3-3-0
   This course will cover the various properties and phenomena of solids such as conductors, insulators, and semiconductors on the basis of quantum and statistical mechanics. Based on the free electron model and the energy band theory, it will deal with the lattice structure of solids, lattice vibrations, semiconductors, electromagnetic and optical properties of solids, surface phenomena, and superconducting phenomena.
884.404Fluid Mechanics 3-3-0
   This course will provide students with a systematic description of macroscopic dynamics of fluids from the viewpoint of classical mechanics. Basic equations of fluid are derived and applied to the related phenomena. Topics will include physical properties of fluids, the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy, vorticity equation and Kelvin's theorem, the motion of two- and three-dimensional perfect fluids, incompressible viscous fluids, laminar flow and turbulence.
884.405A Advanced Optics 3-3-0
   This course will cover modern optics and its applications, such as Fourier optics, statistical optics, the interaction between light and matter, and the basic principles of laser. Knowledges on Electricity and Magnetism, Electromagnetic Waves and Optics, and Quantum Physics 1 are required.
884.406APhysics and New Technology 3-3-0
   This course aims for providing students with opportunity to contemplate on how physical principles are utilized in modern technology and how physical discovery can lead to a new technology. Accordingly the bulk of this course is concentrated on topics related to the application of materials physics, solid-state physics, and quantum electronics. Topics may include physics underlying electronic and optical devices, optical characteristics of materials (including biomaterials), microelectronics, superconductors, magnetic materials, semiconductors, and dielectric materials, spintronics, surface physics, Bose-Einstein condensates, carbon nanotubes, laser diagnostics, etc.
884.409Senior Physics Laboratory 3-0-6
   This course is for seniors majoring in physics. Students will select an experiment topic under consultation with a supervisor and carry out projects on the level of research experiments.
3348.401Introductory Biological Physics 3-3-0
   This course is designed for senior students majoring in physics, who want to find out how their knowledge of physics such as mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermal and statistical physics can be applied to the understanding of biological phenomena. Most of the lectures focus on biophysical phenomena at the molecular level, but higher order systems can be considered. A prior knowledge of biology at the high school level is required, whereas further information on biology will be provided during the classes if necessary
3348.402Collective Phenomena in Condensed Matter Physics 3-3-0
   This course is intended to provide a basic viewpoint for "hard" and "soft" condensed matter systems by introducing the concept of collective phenomena and emergent states. Topics may include long-range ordering, phase transition, renormalization, critical phenomena, disordered systems, glasses, superconductivity, quantum phase transitions, strongly correlated systems, and self-organization. Prior knowledge of physics on the level of Quantum Physics 1, 2, Thermal and Statistical Physics, and Properties of Solids is required.
884.407AStudies on Historic Articles of Physics 3-3-0
   This course is designed to help students develop their own idea and probing mind on physics through the understanding and critical analysis of selected physics literatures of historical importance. Presentations and open discussions by students make integral parts of this course.
3348.408Independent Study in Theoretical Physics 3-3-0
   This course is for students who are expected to get a bachelor's degree in physics. Each students choose a special topic in theoretical physics, study intensively, and prepare a thesis for the degree under the supervision of an adviser.
3348.410Independent Study in Experimental Physics 3-3-0
   This course is for students who are expected to take a bachelor's degree in physics. Students will select an experiment topic, study it intensively, and prepare a thesis for a degree under the supervision of an adviser.
 
¢ÁCourses for Non-major Students
300.209CMechanics : Short Course 3-3-0
   This one-semester course covers main concepts and applications of classical mechanics. Topics to be dealt with include vectors, laws of motion, harmonic oscillation, conservation laws, central force, many particle systems, rigid body motion, Lagrange's equations with some simple applications.
3342.002AElectromagnetism : Short Course 3-3-0
   This one-semester course covers basic physical laws of electromagnetic phenomena and their applications. Topics to be discussed include electrostatics, magnetic fields produced by steady currents, properties of dielectrics and magnetic materials, Faraday's law, Maxwell equations, and electromagnetic wave.
3342.305AQuantum Physics : Short Course 3-3-0
   This one-semester course introduces basic concepts of quantum physics and its applications. Topics include the uncertainty principle, 1-D harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom, angular momentum and spin, basics of the perturbation theory, and applications to simple physical system.
 
4. Minors, Dual majors, Single majors
 
Beginning in the year 2008, Seoul National University categorizes the types of undergraduate major coursework completion programs into Dual majors, in which students are conferred with multiple degrees, Integrated majors, in which a student majors in an integrated field of study and is conferred with one degree (for the major in which the student is registered), Student designed majors, Minors, and Single majors where additional credits are completed in the registered major. All students must complete course requirements in accordance with one of the above major coursework completion programs before graduation. Until this institution becomes well-established, the Physics and Astronomy department will for the time being only operate programs for Minors, Dual Majors, and Single Majors which has previously been implemented. In particular, it should be noted that it is possible for students to acquire Dual majors or Minors from among the Physics major and the Astronomy major offered by the department of Physics and Astronomy.

¢Á Minor (including integrated majors)
 1. Selection criteria - based upon grades
2. Application eligibility - completion of 33 credits or more
3. Students are permitted to extent their period of enrollment by 1 year
4. Coursework completion requirements.
    21 credits or more must be completed through major elective courses which must include the following: 300.211 Mechanics 1 (or 300.209C Single Semester Mechanics), 300.214 Electricity and Magnetism (or 3342.002A Single Semester Electromagnetics), 884.303 Quantum Physics 1 (or 3342.305A Single Semester Quantum Physics) and 884.302 Heat and Statistical Physics
¢Á Dual Major (including integrated majors)
 1. Number of selected students - within 100% of the number of undergraduate students.
B. The regulations regarding the dual major for the department of Physics and Astronomy are identical to the course completion regulations for the main major
3. Students are permitted to extend their period of enrollment by 1 year
4. Completion of courses
A. The number of credits must be 39 or more for the Dual Major, and the grade point average must be 2.0 or higher
B. The regulations regarding the dual major for the department of Physics and Astronomy are identical to the course completion regulations for the main major
C. Dual acknowledgement for courses may be given for up to 9 credits in cases where the curriculum of the dual major department (college) gives recognition to the completed course as a major course or up to 3 credits in cases of courses from other departments (or colleges) that are commonly recognized by both the departments (colleges) of the primary registered major and the dual major.
 
¢Á Single major
 1. Concept of the single major - students must complete a certain number of extra credits in the major of the registered department.
2. Eligibility for application - students who do not apply for a dual major or a minor are all required to complete the single major.
3. Course completion regulations
A. The number of required credits for the single major is 60 credits or more.
B. The number of completed credits for the single major must be acquired from major electives which mustincludetherequiredcoursesforthesinglemajorinthedepartmentofPhysicsandAstronomy.
 
5. Matters related to graduation and the undergraduate degree thesis
 
When a student complete the number of required credits for the undergraduate program, the student shall be acknowledged as having completed each respective year of study (33 credits or more for the completion of the 1st year, 66 credits or more for the completion of the 2nd year, 98 credits or more for the completion of the 3rd year, 130 credits or more for the completion of the 4th year), but in order to qualify for graduation, the student must select a thesis advisor professor in the beginning of the year in which he or she wishes to graduate and complete an undergraduate degree thesis under the guidance of the thesis advisory professor. Early in the year of desired graduation, the student must submit a graduation application and pass the graduate thesis review.

¢Á Selecting your thesis advisor professor

 1. Guidelines for application - in beginning of March and September of each year, guidelines shall be posted in the undergraduate administration bulletin board
2. Method of application - students should individually contact the professor who shall become their thesis advisor, obtain the professor¡¯s approval, and submit the application document to the undergraduate administration office.

¢Á Completing your undergraduate degree thesis

 1. Method of completion - Students should either participate in the experimental physics camp and the theoretical physics workshop during the summer or winter vacations and engage in research activities or register for the Physics Research 1 or 2 course and complete the thesis. Students may also conduct research under the individual guidance of the thesis advisor professor to complete their thesis. However, in the case of the experimental physics camp, this may be replaced with the undergraduate internship program that is conducted by the CollegeofNaturalScienceduringsummervacation.
2. Method of review - Students should ask professors to be part of his or her thesis review board after receiving recommendations from his or her thesis advisor professor.
3. Deadline for submission - Advance notice of deadlines shall be posted on the undergraduate bulletin board during June and December of each year.
4. Method of submission - Students should obtain the seal of the reviewing professors and the thesis advisory professor on the completed thesis document and submit it to the undergraduate administration office.