About us  |   Personnel  |  Undergraduate   |   Graduate  |   Research  
 
 





Department of Physics and Astronomy: Guide to the Graduate Program Curriculum

Last updated: July 13, 2009

Graduate school basically consists of master's and doctoral programs. Adding to the courses, a connected operation course of the two programs is provided to help facilitate the advancement from the master's to the doctoral course. However, as the requirements of these courses can often change and vary upon the respective courses students take, students are expected to pay attention to potential changes. Please do visit this web page as your time permits and check for the changes announced in the relevant notices.

In accordance with the internal regulations revised on December 1, 2008, here we shall present the cautionary notes and important requirements to aid graduate students matriculating in the graduate school of the department of Physics and Astronomy in or after 2009. Students who have matriculated before 2008 should refer to pre-existing graduate program guidelines.
 
1. Master's Program

Admissions to the master's program of the Department of Physics and Astronomy are provided twice a year: in the first and second semester, respectively. (Note: the number of students admitted is not always evenly divided between the two semesters.) Upon admission, students must complete a required number of credits not exceeding 12 per semester as well as other requirements as per applicable regulations to be eligible to earn the master's degree. Those students who are admitted to the connected operation of master's and doctoral programs after passing the qualification exam in the undergraduate course can also advance to the doctoral programs.
 
¢Á Qualifications and Screening Requirements for the Master's Program

A.
Qualifications
 Students who earned a bachelor's degree - regardless of college/department
Students scheduled to earn a bachelor's degree - need to earn by the admission date
B.
Screening Requirements
 Document assessment (undergraduate transcript, letter of recommendation, and personal statement)
 Interview and oral examination
 English - TEPS score at least 551, or TOEFL at least 210 by CBT or 77 by iBT or 550 by PBT [TEPS and TOEFL scores should be those from the tests taken within 2 years before the application deadline and submitted no later than the document supplementation date. Only one score as given on the application form will be acknowledged.]
¢Á Assignment of the Thesis Advisor
  • Before the academic advisor is appointed for a master's program entrant, the professor appointed by the head of the Department will advise for the student.
  • During the first year of the master's program, students will be able to have the opportunities to find the area of their interest and its academic approach thru free discussions with the professors they prefer. Meanwhile, the Department provides "the Guidance for Studying at the Graduate School" in the first semester for the students to have more details on the respective research areas by professors.
  • In June (or December in the case of students entering through mid-year admissions) of the first semester of graduate school, students shall be given an orientation on the process of selecting an advising professor. Up to this point, no individual professor shall accept or give promises to accept a particular student as an advised student. Within a designated period after the orientation on the process of selecting an advising professor, students indicate their top 3 preferences for their advisory professor and submit this to the head of the department, who along with the graduate student committee mediates the assignment of advisory professors to students.
  • New students matriculating in the masters program must take the department qualifying examination that is conducted in the December of each year.
    Students who pass the qualifying examination may apply for the integrated masters and doctoral program and those who are selected enter into the doctoral program.
    Students who fail to be selected to the integrated masters and doctoral program or those who desire to receive only the masters degree submit their masters graduation thesis and graduate with the masters degree, and those who wish to enter the doctoral program following graduation must undergo the admissions process in order to enter the doctoral program. Students who do not pass the qualifying examination may take a special test conducted by the masters program graduation thesis review committee in order to graduate.
¢Á Qualifying Examination

  • The department¡¯s qualifying examination is conducted once per year (around December 25th).By principle, students are to take the examination around the end of the first year of the masters program (around December 25th), but in the case of students admitted mid-year or students who are expecting to matriculate, those who have completed t or more credits in graduate level courses are eligible to take the examination.
  • The subjects tested are Classical mechanics, Electrical mechanics, Quantum mechanics and Statistical mechanics, and the distribution of points are based upon a ratio of 1:2:2:1. The evaluation rating is divided into Pass/Fail.
  • Only students who pass the qualifying examination become eligible to apply for the integrated masters and doctoral program.
  • Students may take the qualifying examination up to 2 times, and in cases where the students fail on both of the test opportunities, they are barred from entry into the integrated masters and doctoral program and the doctoral program.

¢Á Thesis Submission Qualification Exam

    In order to earn a doctoral degree, the students who took the qualification exam of the Department should also apply for the Thesis Submission Qualification Exam in either March or September. The Thesis Submission Qualification Exam consists of the major subject test and the foreign language test.

    A.Qualifications
     Students who enrolled in master's program for at least two semesters and gained a minimum of 9 credits
    B.Major test
     Replaced by the qualifying examination conducted by the department. However, in order to receive recognition for the major examination grade, the student mustsubmitaexaminationapplicationbeforethedeadline.
    C.Foreign Language Test
     English - substituted by a TEPS or TOEFL test (students should score a certain level required to submit documents for thesis deliberation procedures)
              TEPS: students of '08- 551 or above / students from '01 to '07 - 550 or above
              TOEFL CBT - 203 or above / iBT - 74 or above

¢Á Course Registration

    Students who enrolled in the master's program are to apply for 12 credits or less each semester, and will be eligible for graduation if they satisfy the following conditions.

  • Required number of completed credits - 24 credits or more (among these, a minimum of 21 credits must have been acquired through lecture or experiment coursework.)
  • Required courses - 4 subjects: Classical Mechanics, Electrodynamics 1, Quantum Mechanics 1, Statistical mechanics (12 credits). Students who have already completed the courses in the undergraduate program are not required to repeat the courses.
  • Students can not register for the course that is the subject of their thesis.
  • Only one course (3 credits) to be acknowledged in Special Research in Physics
  • Up to two core elective courses (6 credits) are acknowledged for those taken in other colleges (departments). One such additional course (3 credits) can be permissible subject to the submission of a letter describing its reason to the head of the Department prior to the beginning of the registration.
  • To earn a degree, students must score an overall GPA of 3.0 or above in both the entire courses and the major courses.


Common courses for the masters program and the integrated masters and doctoral program

 Spring SemesterFall Semester
M.Sc. 3348.501 Introduction to Departmental Research Activities [3-3-0]

3342.514 Classical Mechanics [3-3-0]

3342.515 Electrodynamics 1 1 [3-3-0]

3342.505 Quantum Mechanics 1 1 [3-3-0]

3342.507 Advanced Physics Laboratory [3-0-6]

3342.618 Applied Computational Physics [3-2-2]

3342.516 Electrodynamics 2 2 [3-3-0]

3342.506 Quantum Mechanics 2 2 [3-3-0]

3342.502 Statistical Mechanics [3-3-0]

3342.509 Mathematical Physics [3-3-0]

3342.506 Selected Topics in Physics [3-3-0]

Ph.D. 3342.605A Condensed Matter Physics 1 [3-3-0]

3342.613 Basic Nuclear and Particle PhysicsÇÐ [3-3-0]

3342.616 Advanced Quantum and Many Body Theory [3-3-0]

3342.615 Laser Physics [3-3-0]

3342.635 Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena [3-3-0]

3342.637 Quantum Field Theory 1 [3-3-0]

3342.632 General Relativity [3-3-0]

3342.670 Advanced Condensed Matter Physics [3-3-0]

3342.665 Advanced Theory on Fields and Particles [3-3-0]

3342.641 Advanced Topics in Nuclei and Particles 1 [3-3-0]

3342.652A Advanced Topics in Condensed Matter Physics 1 [3-3-0]

3342.654A Advanced Topics in Applied Physics 1 [3-3-0]

3342.701 Special Research in Physics 1 [3-3-0]

3342.703 Special Research in Physics 3 [3-3-0]

3342.705 Special Research in Physics 5 [3-3-0]

3342.506 Selected Topics in Physics [3-3-0]

3342.633 Nuclear Physics [3-3-0]

3342.631 Particle Physics [3-3-0]

3342.638 Quantum Field Theory 2 [3-3-0]

3342.669 Biological Physics [3-3-0]

3342.606A Condensed Matter Physics 2 [3-3-0]

3342.626A Atomic Physics [3-3-0]

3342.667 Physics of Complex Systems [3-3-0]

3342.668 String Theory [3-3-0]

3342.642 Advanced Topics in Nuclei and Particles 2 [3-3-0]

3342.653A Advanced Topics in Condensed Matter Physics 2 [3-3-0]

3342.655A Advanced Topics in Applied Physics 2 [3-3-0]

3342.702 Special Research in Physics 2 [3-3-0]

3342.704 Special Research in Physics 4 [3-3-0]

3342.706 Special Research in Physics 6 [3-3-0]

3348.501 Introduction to Departmental Research Activities 3-3-0
   Research activities in physics department will be introduced to entering graduate students, to help them to choose proper advisers
3342.514 Classical Mechanics 3-3-0
   The course is intended to introduce Newtonian dynamics and kinematics, Lagrangian dynamics, small oscillations, Hamiltonian dynamics, Hamilton-Jacobi theory and completely integrable systems, regular and chaotic motion of Hamiltonian systems in advanced level.
3342.515 Electrodynamics 1 3-3-0
   The course is intended to introduce classical electromagnetic theory based on classical field theory. Topics include boundary value problems, Green function technique, and applications of Maxwell equations. Macroscopic description of electric and magnetic properties in various materials is also introduced.
3342.505 Quantum Mechanics 1 3-3-0
   Quantum Mechanics provides the foundation of modern physics. This is the first semester of a graduate quantum mechanics course, which is designed for first-year graduate students in physics. It should also be appropriate for students of mathematics, chemistry, and engineering who have good backgrounds in physics. At the end of this semester, students are expected to solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equations in a number of interesting cases and become knowledgable in understanding the wave function in non-relativistic quantum mechanics.
3342.507 Advanced Laboratory 3-0-6
   This course is designed for those with little prior experience in experimental processes. It provides both introductory and advanced study in various methods of conducting experiments. Through the design and management of projects, students learn independent work habits in the laboratory. The level of this course is equal to that of Senior Physics Laboratory (338.409).
3342.606 Solid State Physics 2 3-3-0
   This course provides an introduction to the various physical properties of solids. It is the sequel to Solid State Physics 1 (3342.605) and aims to provide a background in basic physical principles necessary for understanding physical phenomena. Topics include superconductivity, magnetism, ferroelectricity, surfaces and interfaces. Prerequisites are Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics.
3342.516 Electrodynamics 2 3-3-0
   The topic of this course includes propagation, radiation, scattering, and diffraction of electromagnetic waves, wave guides and resonant cavities, collisions between charged particles based on Maxwell equations and special theory of relativity.
3342.506 Quantum Mechanics 2 3-3-0
   This is the second semester of a graduate quantum mechanics course, which is designed for first-year graduate students in physics. It may be appropriate for students of mathematics, chemistry, and engineering who have finished the first semester of the graduate quantum mechanics. At the end of this semester, students are expected to understand the time-independent as well as time-dependent perturbations in various quantum systems. Topics may include approximation methods such as perturbation theory and variational methods, scattering theory, symmetry, identical particles, atoms and molecules, quantum theory of radiation, and relativistic quantum mechanics.
3342.502 Statistical Mechanics 3-3-0
   This course covers the basics of statistical physics and seeks to understand the macroscopic properties of matter as the collective phenomena which result from the interaction among constituents. Topics include equilibrium phenomena - such as partition function, relations between the partition function and thermodynamic quantities, classical and quantum gas, cluster expansion, phase transition - and nonequilibrium phenomena - such as the stochastic equation, kinetic theory, and transport to provide the basic knowledge of the statistical approach for the systems composed of many elements that cooperate strongly.
3342.508 Mathematical Physics 3-3-0
   This course is designed for students to practice the mathematical tools needed for physics research. Topics include calculus, geometry, differential equations, special functions and integral transformation, Green functions, and group theory.
3342.513 Advanced Electronics Lab. 3-0-6
   This course is mainly for the graduate students majoring in experimental physics and related fields. During the course, the students are allowed to choose several topics freely. The topics include the application of OP Amp, practice of rf and vhf circuits, study of filter characteristics and electrical noise reduction techniques, practice with hybrids such as DBM and quadrature hybrid, building A/D and D/A converters and digital electronics circuits, practice with lock¡ªin Amp and signal averagers, opto¡ªelectronic devices and their applications, practice with sensors and converters.
3342.605 Solid State Physics 1 3-3-0
   This course provides an introduction to the various physical properties of solids. It is the sequel to Solid State Physics 1 (3342.605) and aims to provide a background in basic physical principles necessary for understanding physical phenomena. Topics include superconductivity, magnetism, ferroelectricity, surfaces and interfaces. Prerequisites are Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics.
3342.614 Theory of Many Body Systems 3-3-0
   This course covers basic theory in body systems and their applications to the fields of condensed matter physics and nuclear physics. Prerequisites are graduate courses in Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics. Topics include the second quantization, fermion systems, boson systems, field theory at finite temperature, phonons and electrons, linear response and collective mode, nuclear matter, superconductivity, superfluidity, application to finite size systems, and atomic nucleus.
3342.618 Applied Computational Physics 3-2-2
   This course is intended to improve students ability to employ computers for physics research and to properly view them as paradigms of modern physics. Topics include concepts of computational method, basic numerical analysis, the Monte-Carlo method, elementary methods of data analysis, parallel processing, neural network method, basic concepts of computer devices, and solutions of partial differential equations.
3342.508 Selected Topics in Physics 3-3-0
   This course is primarily designed for master course students, and covers current theory and scholarly research in the field of physics.
3342.633 Nuclear Physics 3-3-0
   This course covers general theory in nuclear physics. Topics include the nuclear force, electromagnetic properties of the atomic nucleus and beta decay, and nuclear structure and reactions. The prerequisites are classical physics and Quantum Mechanics.
3342.631 Particle Physics 3-3-0
   This course covers the phenomenology of whole particle physics. Topics include the classification of elementary particles and symmetry, fundamental interactions and their properties, and the experimental and theoretical backgrounds of the Standard Model. Prerequisites are Classical Physics, Electrodynamics, and Quantum Mechanics.
3342.615 Laser Physics 3-3-0
   This course covers properties of the laser and its application. Topics include classical and quantum-mechanical laser techniques, non-linear optics, light scattering, semiconductors which use lasers, and induced waves.
3342.617 Device Physics 3-3-0
   During the semester, we will cover various aspects of solid-state devices. First, we will cover the various techniques in realizing device quality materials as well as device assembly. Then, we will overview various concepts in semiconductor device physics (both group IV and III-V) such as metal/semiconductor, metal/insulator/semiconductor interfaces and pn junctions and how such ideas are applied in current research in condensed matter (i.e. carbon nanotube devices, single electron transistors, magnetoelectronics). We will then apply such device concepts in non-semiconductor materials such as superconductors, ferromagnetic metals, ferroelectrics, and organics.
3342.635 Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena 3-3-0
   This course examines how model systems relate to phase transitions and critical phenomena as well as methods of statistical mechanics. Major topics include critical exponents, exact properties of model systems, mean field theory, Landau theory, Landau-Ginzburg theory, series expansions, scaling theory, the renormalization group theory, perturbation expansion, low dimensional systems, and disorder. The prerequisite for this course is Statistical Mechanics.
3342.637 Quantum Field Theory 1 3-3-0
   Basic structures of relativistic quantum fields are explained using canonical and path integral methods. Discussion of free fields of spin-O, spin-1/2 and spin-1 is followed by an investigation of quantum electrodynamics(QED). Perturbation theory is examined and then applied to simple scattering processes in QED. Prerequisites are graduate study in classical physics and quantum mechanics.
3342.665 Electrodynamics 2 3-3-0
   The topic of this course includes propagation, radiation, scattering, and diffraction of electromagnetic waves, wave guides and resonant cavities, collisions between charged particles based on Maxwell equations and special theory of relativity.
3342.626 Atomic and Molecular Physics 3-3-0
   This course covers fundamental theories of atoms and molecules. Topics include the energy of hydrogen and multi-electron atoms, angular momentum theory, relativistic correction, interactions between atoms and electromagnetic waves, the electronic energy of molecules, vibrational and rotational energy, Raman spectroscopy, and applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
3342.632 General Relativity 3-3-0
   This course provides the conceptual, physical, and mathematical foundation of general relativity. Topics include physical and mathematical methods of curved spacetime, Einstein's field equation and its primary outcome, and applications in the field of cosmology.
3342.638 Quantum Field Theory 2 3-3-0
   This course is a continuationa of Quantum field Theory 1. Discussion topics include higher-order processes in QED, renormalization, spontaneous symmetry breaking, quantization of non-abelian gauge theory, applications of renormalization group theory, field theory for standard models, and supersymmetry.
3342.641~3 Advanced Topics in Nuclei and Particles 1~3 3-3-0
   This course is designed for both masters and doctoral level students who are majoring in nuclear or particle physics. The topics are selected according to curriculum requirements.
3342.652~6 Advanced Topics in Condensed Matter Physics 1~5 3-3-0
   This course is designed for both masters and doctoral level students majoring in condensed matter physics. Topics are selected according to curriculum requirements.
3342.666 Physics of Strongly Correlated Systems 3-3-0
   This course is designed to provide a basic framework for the understanding of strongly correlated electron systems. Fermi liquid theory and various sum rules in interacting electron systems will be introduced starting with introductory many¡ªbody techniques for the description of interacting electron systems. Several key models of correlated systems such as Hubbard, Anderson, and Kondo Hamiltonians will be examined as a way to understand the cooperative phenomena such as superconductivity and magnetism, in the correlated systems.
3342.667 Physics of Complex Systmes3-3-0
   Many generic systems in nature exhibit complexity, characterized by large variability, on the border of order and disorder. Understanding such complex systems, usually possessing frustration together with randomness, offers a challenge in this century. Beginning with relatively simple complex systems in physics, we study diverse phenomena displayed by a variety of complex systems in physics, chemistry, biology, and social sciences. Emphasis will be laid on the universal principles underlying the diversity, probed by means of statistical mechanics and nonlinear dynamics.
3342.701~5 Special Research in Physics 1~5 3-3-0
   This is in common for the master's and doctor's course students. It is run depending on the necessity of a physics curriculum.


2. Doctoral Program

Students who were admitted to the master's program of Physics in the Department of Physics and Astronomy of SNU can advance to the connected course of master's and doctoral programs, or those students who earned a master's degree in physics either in SNU or another university can advance to the doctoral program of SNU in May or October. The maximum number of the students in the doctoral program is only half the number of students for the master's program, and the quorum for the second semester is typically less than that of the first semester.

   1) Connected Course of Master's and Doctoral Programs

 
        ¢Á Qualifications and Screening Requirements for the Connected Course of Master's and Doctoral Programs

    A. Qualifications
  Students who have completed two semesters (18 credits) and are currently enrolled in the master's program of Department of Physics and Astronomy (excluding those who finished or will be finishing, the program), and Scored an overall GPA of 3.3.or above, and, Passed the Qualification Exam for the doctoral program of the Department
    B. Components
  The scores acquired on the departmental qualifying examination and the point acquired by converting the grade point average of coursework completed in the first year of graduate school

        ¢Á Thesis Submission Qualification Exam
    Students who took the qualification exam of the Department and advanced to the connected course of the master's and doctoral programs also should apply for the Doctoral Thesis Submission Qualification Exam in either March or September. The exam consists of the major subject test and the foreign language test.

        A. Qualifications
      Students who enrolled in the connected course of master's and doctoral programs for at least five semesters and gained a minimum of 36 credits
        B. Major Subject Test
      After submission of the application form, students should take the Major Subject Test of the Doctoral Thesis Submission Qualification Test given by the Graduate School Committee
        C. Foreign Language Test
      English - substituted by a TEPS or TOEFL test (students should score a certain level required to submit documents for thesis deliberation procedures)
             TEPS: students of '08- 551 or above / students from '01 to '07 - 550 or above
             TOEFL CBT - 203 or above / iBT 74 or above
        D. Students in the connected course who want to graduate in the middle of the program with a master degree:
      Should submit a letter of cancellation of the program and take the Master's Thesis Submission Qualification Exam

        ¢Á Course Registration
    Students admitted to the connected course of master's and doctoral programs are to apply for 12 credits or less each semester, and complete four semesters. When they complete 24 credits in total, then they are deemed to have entered the doctoral program. They will be eligible for graduation if they satisfy the following conditions.

    • Required number of credits completed - 60 credits or more (Including credits completed during the masters program), and among these, a minimum of 39 credits (theory majors) or 36 credits (experiment majors), including 3 credits or more from courses in other fields of study, must be completed through enrollment in lectures or experiment courses.
    • Required courses - the following four courses: Classical Mechanics, Electrodynamics 1, Quantum Mechanics 1, Statistical mechanics(12 credits). Students who have already completed a courses in their undergraduate or masters program are not required to re-take the course in question.
    • Students can register for one course of the subject of their thesis per semester.
    • Students can take a maximum of 21 credits (up to 24 credits for majors of experiments) in the Special Research in Physics including the subject of their thesis of graduate school.
    • Up to two core elective courses (6 credits) are acknowledged for those taken in other colleges (departments). One such additional course (3 credits) can be permissible subject to the submission of a letter describing its reason to the head of the Department prior to the beginning of the registration.
    • To earn a degree, students must score an overall GPA of 3.0 or above in both the entire courses and the major courses.

   2) Doctoral Program
 
        ¢Á Qualifications and Screening Requirements for the Doctoral Program

    A. Qualifications
  Majors of physics who have completed the master's and doctoral programs, and earned a master's degree, or who are scheduled to earn one before the admission date
    B. Screening Requirements
  Screening of the transcripts of Undergraduate and Graduate courses, Personal Statement, and Letter of Recommendation (by the thesis advisors during the master's and doctoral programs)
          Interview and Oral Examination
          English (TEPS 551 or above, or TOEFL 210 or above (CBT) / 77 or above (iBT) / 550 or above (PBT))

        ¢Á Thesis Submission Qualification Exam
    The students admitted to the doctoral program without the Doctoral Qualification Exam in the Department will be permitted to begin research for their thesis only when they pass the qualification exam after admission. In order to earn a doctoral degree, students who passed the qualification exam also should apply for the Doctoral Thesis Submission Qualification Exam in either March or September. The exam consists of the major subject test and the foreign language test.

        A. Qualifications
      Students who have enrolled for at least two semesters in the doctoral programs and earned a minimum of 9 credits
        B. Major Subject Test
      After submission of the application form, students should take the Major Subject Test of the Doctoral Thesis Submission Qualification Test given by the Graduate School Committees formed as per students.
        C. Foreign Language Test
      English - substituted by a TEPS or TOEFL test (students should score a certain level required to submit documents for thesis deliberation procedures)
             TEPS: students of '08- 551 or above / students from '01 to '07 - 550 or above
              TOEFL CBT - 203 or above / iBT - 74 or above

        ¢Á Course Registration
    Students admitted to the doctoral programs are to apply for 12 credits or less each semester, and they will be eligible for graduation if they satisfy the following conditions.

    • Required number of completed credits - 60 credits or more (Including credits completed during the masters program), and among these, a minimum of 39 credits (theory majors) or 36 credits (experiment majors) must be completed through enrollment in lectures or coursework.
    • Required courses - the following four courses: Classical Mechanics, Electrodynamics 1, Quantum Mechanics 1, Statistical mechanics (12 credits). Students who have already completed a courses in their undergraduate or masters program are not required to re-take the course in question.
    • Students can register for one course of the subject of their thesis per semester.
    • Students can take a maximum of 21 credits (up to 24 credits for majors of experiments) in the Special Research in Physics including the subject of their thesis of graduate school.
    • Up to two core elective courses (6 credits) are acknowledged for those taken in other colleges (departments). One such additional course (3 credits) can be permissible subject to the submission of a letter describing its reason to the head of the Department prior to the beginning of the registration.
    • Summing up of the credits of the master's and doctoral programs: In the case of the students who acquired 24 or more credits during the master's program and are admitted to the doctoral program, their excess credits will be acknowledged as the aggregate credits in their course registration in the early freshman year (March or September)
    • To earn a degree, students must score an overall GPA of 3.0 or above in both the entire courses and the major courses.


3. Scholarships

The students in the Graduate School (majors of physics), and the doctoral program of the Department of Physics and Astronomy can receive three University Scholarships as well as such External Scholarships as National Science and Engineering Grants, Seoul (Science) Scholarship, Lotte Scholarship, and Kwanjeong Scholarship.

(1) BK (BK General Aid, BK Scholarship)

    Master's Program BK General Aid
  • The students in the second year of the master's program who scored an overall GPA of 3.0 or above in the freshman year will be preferentially selected. (However, the students who made very poor grades in the second year, or received any disciplinary measure shall be disqualified from the scholarships.
  • Freshmen to receive scholarships will be selected based on the scores at the time of admission (for the first semester), or the scores in the first semester (for the second semester).
  • As for those students to whom the above criteria may not be applicable yet have special reasons, the head of the Department will determine upon the recommendations by the academic advisor thru the assessment by the Graduate School Committee.
  • Scholarships will be only paid until the fourth semester of the master's program.
    Master's Program BK Scholarship
  • Master's Program BK Scholarships are provided to a certain number of the entrants to the master's program each semester who are selected on the basis of their scores, and to a certain number of the students who advanced to the second year and are selected on the basis of the qualification exam and their course scores. The Graduate School Committee selects the recipients, who will be paid a certain amount of scholarships (about KRW 300,000 a month) in addition to the Mater's Program BK General Aid. Once selected, the students will basically receive the scholarships for a year.
  • Scholarships will be only paid until the fourth semester of the master's program.

    Doctoral Program BK General Aid
  • Most of the students will be paid the grants for the graduate students from the BK Scholarships, and the rest of them will be paid a certain amount as allocated from various scholarships from in and out of the university, research funds of professors, or other kinds of grants.
  • Scholarships will only be paid until the eighth semester of the doctoral program.

    Doctoral Program BK Scholarship A (BK fellowship)
  • This scholarship is provided to a certain number of the students in the Doctoral program each semester who published an excellent thesis or produced super research results, and the recipients will be paid a certain amount of scholarships (about KRW 300,000 a month) in addition to the Doctoral Program BK General Aid. (one year payment)
  • Scholarships will only be paid until the eighth semester of the doctoral program
    Master's and Doctoral Program BK Scholarship B (BK Scholarship)
  • This scholarship is provided to a student who published a paper in the SCI journal (IF factor > alpha) as its first author in the preceding year. The recipient will be paid a certain amount in addition to the existing KRW 900,000 (Doctor), and KRW 500,000 (Master). The amount of both the new and existing payments will be decided upon the budgets available.

    Supporting the Mid- and Long-Term Overseas Research Study and Paper Presentations at Conferences by Masters and Doctors

    Evidentiary Documents to Submit to Receive the BK General Aid
  • Application for the Bank Depositing of the Personnel Expenditures (to submit in early Mar., or early Sep.)
  • Other evidentiary documents
    (Written consent to the use of personal information, Confirmation on the four major social insurances; to be issued as of Apr.1, or Oct.1)
(2) Exemption of the Tuition Fee and Development Fund Scholarship

    The entrants to the master's programs with excellent admission scores will be exempt from the tuition fee as per their order of scores and the allocated number of the recipients. The graduate students in needy conditions yet with excellent academic performance records will be paid a scholarship supported by the SNU Development Fund.

(3) Lecture & Research Support Scholarship

  • Qualifications
    - Students who are recommended by their academic advisor (one student per academic advisor)
    - Students in the doctoral program (in principle)
    - Students in the third year of the connected course of master's and doctoral programs will be treated the same as the doctoral students for this scholarship only.
    - Students who scored an overall GPA of 3.3 or above in the preceding semester of the graduate school (excluding new entrants)
  • Amount to be paid: Exemption of the total tuition fee + Fixed monthly payments
    - Doctoral: Total tuition fee and KRW300,000/month
    - Master: Total tuition fee and KRW200,000/month
    - Research students are paid the fixed monthly scholarships only (doctoral research student: KRW900,000 per month / master research student: KRW500,000 per month)
  • Criteria for Allocating the Number of the Recipients:
    - One student per professor
    - In case a professor has no student to support under his/her guidance at a specific semester, the scholarship may be deferred once a year only.
 
4. Graduation and Degree Conferment

When they complete the course and their thesis gets passed, graduate students or those who finished their course will be granted their corresponding degree and diploma as per the following procedures.

(1) Research Activity

    Students conduct research activities under the academic advisor's guidance. The time to the writing of the thesis can vary, but the students need to check the time given as there is a time limit to the submission of the thesis upon the completion of the course. (it can be extended within the limit of 2 years; masters- 4 years / doctors- 6 years) Students can make public the results of their research activities thru oral presentations at academic societies at home and abroad, or publish them in scientific journal. In some cases, they can be patented or registered as intellectual property thru the SNU's Industrial-Educational Foundation.

(2) Preliminary Deliberation of the Doctoral Thesis

    As the academic advisor deems the research activities almost ready to be prepared for the thesis to be submitted, a preliminary deliberation should be arranged so that an outline of the research be presented to, and reviewed by, the SNU's judges. The preliminary deliberation should be conducted within one month of the beginning of the each semester, but the thesis for a master's degree does not need the procedure.

(3) Thesis Deliberation

    The students in the doctoral program who passed the preliminary deliberation, or the students in the master's program whose thesis the advisor considers is ready for deliberation should have their thesis go thru the thesis deliberation as per the following procedures.

  • Registration of Thesis Submission Candidates & Payment of Thesis Deliberation Fee
    - Early April (students to graduate in Apr.), or early Oct. (students to graduate in Feb.)
    - Students who have completed the graduate course should enroll as a research student of the graduate school within the registration period of the corresponding semester.
    - Registration Documents: master (Master's Thesis Deliberation Request Form)
    Doctor (Thesis Deliberation Request Form, Advisor's Recommendation, Resume)
    - Thesis Deliberation Fee: make a payment at banks (Nonghyup and Shinhan Bank), and submit the receipt to the office of academic & administrative affairs

  • Acceptance of Thesis for Deliberation and List of the Journals
    - Master: submit the thesis summary by the end of May (students to graduate in Aug.) or by the end of Nov. (students to graduate in Feb.)
    - Doctor: submit the thesis summary and the list of the journals in which the thesis was published by the end of May (students to graduate in Aug.) or by the end of Nov. (students to graduate in Feb.)
    [Students who did not publish their thesis (or Confirmation of the Planned Publication) in the journals listed in SCI can not have the thesis deliberation within the semester.]

  • Thesis Deliberation Procedures
    - Master: to be presented at a Thesis Announcement (those who have announced at conferences at home or abroad are exempt from the presentation at a Thesis Announcement) and examines by three internal judges
    - Doctor: one to three examinations by four internal judges
      Open presentation [Besides judges and students in the same lab, every one who is interested is welcome to the presentations.]
      Final judgment to be made by five judges including one outside judge
    - Thesis deliberation should be finished no later than Jun.14 (students to graduate in Aug.), or Dec.14 (students to graduate in Feb.)
(4) Submission of Thesis for Storage and On-line Submission

    Students who have passed the Thesis Deliberation should submit their thesis for storage along with an online submission to the University within the designated time limit.

  • Online Submission of Thesis
    - Submit by the early next month of the deliberation finished
    - Submit the diskette containing the thesis content to the University Library (Lobby at 4th floor)

  • Submission of the Thesis for Storage
    - Submit by the early next month of the deliberation finished
    - Master: four copies of the silver hardcover thesis for storage
      Doctor: four copies of the gold hardcover thesis for storage
      [One copy of the theses should be bear "Notice of Approval" signed by all of the judges, and "Written Consent to the Use of the Thesis Content"]
    - Printing method of thesis: Refer to Article 8, SNU Regulation of Degree Conferment
      [The title and contents of the theses for storage should match those of the thesis that passed the Thesis Deliberation procedures.]

(5) Excellent Graduation Thesis Paper Award

    Prizes are being awarded every semester on the superb doctoral theses selected. (Excellent Thesis Award and Second Award)
 
5. Use of the Department Facilities and Safety Rules

¡Û Computer Room
(1) Time for Use
Weekdays 09:00 ~ 18:00
Students who want to use the room during the other time can pick up the key to the room from the staff in charge of the room. Use of the room is limited to the study purpose by the researchers or those in the higher level in the master's and doctoral programs of the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

(2) Resources and Equipment
Mail, file server
Windows xp terminal
Common computing server - Linux
Printer

(3) Location
Room203, Complex #56 -Phone: 02-880-6620
¡Û Library
(1) Time for Use
Weekdays 09:00 ¡­ 18:00

(2) Location
Room214, Complex #56 -Phone: 02-880-6619

(3) Maximum checkouts and Loan Period
- Professors 10 books 90 days
- Part time lecturer and researchers 10 books 30 days
- Graduate students and those who completed courses 5 books 15 days
- Undergraduate students (Junior, Senior) 5 books 7 days
(¡Ø Borrowing is limited to circulating books and theses only; Journals do not circulate.)
While reading or copying the library materials are permitted to general patrons, borrowing is only limited to those who belong to the Department of Physics.)

(4) Returning
- Any books checked out should be returned by the due date.
- When a due date falls on a holyday, the due date becomes its next day.
- On renewal will be available for each book checked out.

(5) Overdue Return
- A hold two times the overdue dates will be placed on anyone who has not returned books by the due date.

(6) Compensation for Damages
- Borrowers should be responsible for any loss or damages inflicted to checkouts

(7) Copying of Materials
- In principle, copying is restricted to the materials of the Department of Physics library. (However, copying the entire book is not permitted.)
- Copying for personal use by undergraduate students is not permitted. (ex: copying notebook)
- For copying, copying cards can be purchased, or copying cars for borrowing can be used. (KRW 30 per page)

¡Ø Those who carry books outside the library without permission will be suspended from using the library for at 90 days.
¡Û Student workshop
(1) Time for Use
Anytime (access limited to students who have completed the user education program)

(2) Location
Room106, Complex #23 -Phone: 02-880-8163

¡Û Electronic circuits lab
(1) Time for Use
Anytime (access limited to students who have completed the user education program)

(2) Location
Room208, Complex #23